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Where seniors are receiving services

February 19, 2015
by Lois A. Bowers, Senior Editor
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Where are concentrations of older adults living in nursing homes and residential care facilities? Where are they receiving home healthcare, hospice care or adult day services? Newly released data (PDF) from the Long-Term Care Statistics Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics answer such questions.

The branch has released state and District of Columbia data from the first (2012) wave of its National Study of Long-Term Care Providers. Data come from the the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, state licensing agencies of residential care communities and the National Adult Day Services Association.

National tables include nursing home residents aged 85 or more years, residential care residents aged 85 or more years, discharged home health patients aged 85 or more years, adult day service patients aged 85 or more years, and hospice patients aged 85 or more years.

Some highlights:

Nursing homes: Several states in the center of the country, as well as a few in the Northeast, had concentrations of older residents that were significantly higher than the national average, whereas some western states as well as Alaska, Florida, Hawaii and Michigan had concentrations of older residents that were significantly lower than the national average.

Residential care: Several states along the northern border and west coast of the country, as well as Alaska, Maine, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Vermont and some other states, had concentrations of older residents that were significantly higher than the national average. Several New England states, states in the eastern Midwest and central southern states had concentrations of older residents that were significantly lower than the national average.

Home health: In Florida, Texas and Michigan, concentrations of older residents were significantly higher than the national average. Alaska, Arizona, Kansas and several states along the northern border of the country had concentrations of older residents that were significantly lower than the national average.

Hospice: In Georgia, Oklahoma, Texas and Utah, concentrations of older residents were significantly higher than the national average. In New York and Wyoming, concentrations of older residents were significantly lower than the national average.

More national and state data are online (PDF).

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