New proposed focus for Alzheimer’s research: iron

In a paper published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, the team proposes a new theory for how rare gene mutations cause Alzheimer's disease. A theory that, if proven, could assist in finding a way to prevent the crippling disease.

The researchers caution people against making choices about diet or supplements based on this idea, as their theory only relates to how cells handle iron, not how much iron is in a person's diet, according to Science Daily.

"For 20 years most scientists have believed that a small protein fragment, amyloid beta, causes Alzheimer's disease," says Associate Professor Michael Lardelli, School of Biological Sciences, the University of Adelaide.

"Clearing out amyloid beta from the brains of people who are developing Alzheimer's disease can slow their rate of cognitive decline. But, so far, nothing has been able to stop the relentless progression of the disease," he says.

A chance conversation between Associate Professor Lardelli, Dr Amanda Lumsden (South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and Flinders University) and Dr Morgan Newman (the University of Adelaide) was the inspiration for the new theory of how mutations might cause Alzheimer's disease.

Read the full story at Science Daily.


Topics: Alzheimer's/Dementia , Uncategorized